Advice: coparenting and coronavirus
Helpful tips for co-parenting during the Coronavirus pandemic
 

In these uncertain times, keeping a routine will help your child to feel safe and secure. Whilst your child's school may be closed, consider sticking to normal meal and bedtimes and any other family rituals your child takes comfort in - for example movie night or reading a book together before bed.

Keeping a routine:

The child arrangements that you have in place – where a child lives and how they spend their time with both parents – are also very important parts of their routine. You should maintain these if possible, and the current government regulations allow this.

The President of the Family Division (who is the leading Family Judge for England and Wales) has issued guidance, which you can read here. We've also written a short glossary of terms, which helps explain some of the legal language used in the Court Guidance.

Think creatively about how you can support your child to stay in touch with their other parent and family members during any period of self-isolation. Skype and Facetime can be great ways to catch up and can be used to read stories, sing and play together. With older children you could also consider a watch party – where you gather online to watch a movie or video, commenting and ‘reacting’ in real time.

Keeping in touch with other parents or family members:

Think creatively about how you can support your child to stay in touch with their other parent and family members during any period of self-isolation. Skype and Facetime can be great ways to catch up and can be used to read stories, sing and play together. With older children you could also consider a watch party – where you gather online to watch a movie or video, commenting and ‘reacting’ in real time.

Keep children out of earshot when discussing arrangements:
Be extra vigilant when making sure that children cannot hear discussions about any dispute you may have with your child’s other parent. This is particularly relevant now as they are at home and there may be discussions taking place about arrangements. Exposing children to these disputes can result in them feeling confused, having divided loyalties and may harm them emotionally.

Social distancing:

If your household is not in self-isolation, then you and your child must still maintain sensible social distancing from members of the public. This means avoiding all social activities– and only using public transport if you really have to.

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